ON THIS DAY OF NIA (PURPOSE) - BEFORE WE CAN

BECOME ONE IN AFRICAN SOLIDARITY, WE MUST 

REMOVE THE SHACKLES THAT BIND OUR AFRICAN 

MINDS, HEARTS, AND SPIRITS!
 
"AFRICANS, FREE THYSELF IN ORDER, TO KNOW 

THYSELF, IN ORDER TO HELP THYSELF"!
                                                                     
Chinue X - 1/27/2012

AFRICAN-CENTERED BOOK LIST


AFRICAN CHILDREN READING LIST 
  • Verna Aardema, Koi & The Kola Nuts
  • Veronica Ellis, Afro-Bets First Book About Africa
  • Michael Faul, The Story of Africa and Her Flags to Color
  • Muriel Feelings, Jambo Means Hello and Moja Means One
  • Virginia Hamilton, The People Could Fly
  • Arthur Lewin, Africa is Not a Country, It's a Continent
  • Sundaria Morninghouse, Harbari Gani? What's the News?
  • Sherley Anne Williams, Working Cotton
  • Jane Yolen, Encounter
 
AFRICAN YOUTH READING LIST
  • Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart
  • S.E.Anderson, The Black Holocaust for Beginners
  • Na'im Akbar, Chains and Images of Psychological Slavery and [color=red]VISIONS[/red] for BLACK MEN
  • Akil, From Niggas to Gods, Part One
  • Chike Akua, A Treasure Within
  • Molefi Kete Asante, Classical Africa
  • Ayi Kwei Armah, Two Thousand Seasons
  • Mwalimu Baruti, The Sex Imperative
  • Anthony Browder, From the Browder Files
  • Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower
  • James Cameron, A Time of Terror
  • John Henrik Clarke, Africans at the Crossroads
  • Gaidi Faraj, Ourstory: Afrikans from Antiquity to the 21st Century
  • Sam Greenlee,The Spook Who Sat by the Door
  • Asa G. Hilliard, Larry Williams and Nia Damali (eds), The Teachings of Ptahhote
  • Jacqueline Johnson, Stokely Carmichael
  • Indus Khamit-Kush, What They Never Told You in History Class
  • Zak A. Kondo, The Black Student's Guide to Positive Education and His-storical Lies and Myths that Miseducate Black People
  • Joseph Marshall, Street Soldier
  • Patricia & Frederick McKissach, Rebels Against Slavery
  • Erriel D. Roberson, The Maafa & Beyond
  • J.A.Rogers, Great Men of Color, Vols. I & II
  • Sister Souljah, The Coldest Winter Ever
  • Carter G. Woodson, The Miseducation of the Negro
  • Amos N. Wilson, The Falsification of Afrikan Consciousness
  • Bobby E. Wright, The Psychopathic Racial Personality
  • Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X

Today, January 1, is a Day of Self Reflection According to Kawaida Theory

Kwanzaa is based upon the premise of KAWAIDA:


"that social revolutionary change for Black America can be achieved by the act of revealing and disclosing individuals to their cultural African heritage." Karenga


Each year, on January 1st, Dr. Karenga suggests that we ask ourselves the three (3) Kawaida questions, originally posed by Frantz Fanon, author of "Wretched of the Earth."




KAWAIDA QUESTIONS:


1. WHO AM I?
"To answer the question of "Who am I?" correctly, then, is to know and live one's history and to practice one's culture."


2. AM I REALLY ALL I SAY I AM?
"To answer the question of "Am I really all I say I am?" is to have and employ a cultural criteria of authenticity, i.e., criteria of what is real and unreal, what is appearance and essence, what is culturally-rooted and foreign."


3. AM I ALL I OUGHT TO BE?
"And to answer the question of "Am I all I ought to be?" is to self-consciously possess and use ethical and cultural standards which measure men, women and children in terms of the quality of their thought and practice in the context of who they are and must become - in both an African and human sense."


http://www.endarkenment.com/kwanzaa/nguzosaba/sikuyataamuli.htm