THE 42 DIVINE PRINCIPLES OF THE NTRT MA'AT
(As shared on Facebook by Awo Yaa Asantewaa Ankomah)
 
The Neophyte's (student) ultimate aim in Kemet was for a person to become "One with God" or to "become like God." The path to the development of godlike qualities was through the development of virtue, but virtue could only be achieved through special study and effort. According to George G. M. James in his timeless work Stolen Legacy writes: The following of the 10 virtues were sought by the Neophyte in ancient Kemet. In the final analysis, the ancient Kemites sought Maát or to be more correct they sought to become one with Maát, the cosmic order.

(1). Control of thoughts
(2). Control of actions
(3). Devotion of purpose
(4). Have faith in the ability of your teacher to teach you the truth.
(5). Have faith in yourself to assimilate the truth
(6). Have faith in themselves to wield the truth
(7). Be free from resentment under the experience of persecution.
(8). Be free from resentment under the experience of wrong.
(9). Cultivate the ability to distinguish between right and wrong and
(10). Cultivate the ability to distinguish between the real and the unreal
 
 

December 10, 2012 - BLOGGING FOR HUMAN RIGHTS DAY


In order for us as poor and oppressed people to become part of a society that is meaningful, the system under which we now exist has to be radically changed. This means that we are going to have to learn to think in radical terms. I use the term radical in its original meaning-- getting down to and understanding the root cause. It means facing a system that does not lend itself to your needs and devising means by which you change that system.” - Ella Jo Baker
 
 
THE U.S. EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM AND AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDENTS
As an African American native of Oakland, California, a product of the Oakland Unified School District’s (OUSD) educational system, and a mother of children who were also students of the same system, I am aware of the weaknesses that continue to exist with the instruction of African American children and youth. As a child of the OUSD system, I remember reading about American history and the building of the Americas, and how rarely were there images of African Americans or any attention, by teachers, given to Africans and African American’s contributions. As a parent of children in the OUSD, I observed the same lack of African American imagery in my children’s homework assignments, teaching instruction, and classroom settings. Overall, When it came to images of people with the same complexion, the same hair texture, the same thick lips, the same broad nose, as my children, family, friends and I, there were many images of people of African descent with these features that were considered to be savages, primitive, and uncivilized – a people that had to be “made” civilized through the Eurocentric teachings of Christianity. The rare images that I did observe and came to appreciate were few: Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglass, and Dr. Martin Luther King., Jr. I remember often wondering as a child, “Were there only a handful of people with the same African/Black features as me that made significant contributions to society? - Were people of my likeness vicious beast that were un-intelligent, lazy, ignorant, etc.?” Having this mental dilemma at such an early and impressionable age, could and would have a lasting impact on my self-identity, my self-worth, and would lead to another self-imposed question unanswered; “Where would I fit in society?” Had it not been for my parents, extended family and my community teachings of the importance of education and Black Pride; I would have so easily been able to answer “yes” to my self-imposed questions, based on the traditional and mainstream educational system, teaching practices, and the curriculum of the OUSD educational system. In the same vein, when I observed the homework assignments and projects that my children were given, they were not representative of who they were as African Americans. My children were being assimilated and acculturated in the same system that viewed Africans as objects as opposed to the subjects of their existence.
Historically, the U.S. educational system’s curriculum and teaching practices has been culturally centered on a Eurocentric worldview, not taking into account the various ethnicities and cultures that create these classroom settings. The Europeans continue today to use the educational system as a crucial tool in the advancement of white supremacy and domination. Within this cultural hegemony, Africans and African Americans have been adversely affected by the Eurocentric form of education. In the early 20th century, Carter G. Woodson (1933), the Father of Negro History and Black History Month proclaimed in his critical novel, “The Mis-Education of the Negro”, that African Americans have been disenfranchised educationally in the United States.  He explains:
“The oppressor…teaches the Negro that he has no worth-while past, that his race has done nothing since the beginning of time, and that there is no evidence that he will ever achieve anything great…Lead the Negro to believe this and thus control his thinking. If you can thereby determine what he will think, you will not need to worry about what he will do.”
“If you teach the Negro that he has accomplished as much good as any other race he will aspire to equality and justice without regard to race. Such and effort would upset the program of the oppressor in Africa and America…Let him learn to admire the Hebrew, the Greek, the Latin and the Teuton. Lead the Negro to detest the man of African blood-to hate himself. The oppressor then may conquer, exploit, oppress and even annihilate the Negro…without fear or trembling.”(p.192)
 
 
"We must voice our protests on the inequalities that continue to exist in the educational system in order to perpetuate mainstream propaganda that one culture and people are superior to all others. We must allow All cultures to become grounded in their own existence."         Chinue X
 
 

 
 
 

 
Join ASALH In Celebrating The
 
87th Annual Black History Month Luncheon & Featured Authors' Event

 Theme: At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality:
The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington

Saturday, Feb 23, 2013 10:00am - 3:30pm
Washington Marriott Wardman Park Hotel
2660 Woodley Road N.W.
Washington, DC 20008
 
Mission

The mission of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is to promote, research, preserve, interpret and disseminate information about Black life, history and culture to the global community.
 

About ASALH

Established on September 9, 1915 by Dr. Carter G. Woodson, we are the Founders of Black History Month and carry forth the work of our founder, the Father of Black History.

We continue his legacy of speaking a fundamental truth to the world--that Africans and peoples of African descent are makers of history and co-workers in what W. E. B. Du Bois called, "The Kingdom of Culture." ASALH's mission is to create and disseminate knowledge about Black History, to be, in short, the nexus between the Ivory Tower and the global public. We labor in the service of Blacks and all humanity.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr wrote:
 
“You may be 38 years old, as I happen to be. And one day, some great opportunity stands before you and calls you to stand up for some great principle, some great issue, some great cause. And you refuse to do it because you are afraid…. You refuse to do it because you want to live longer…. You’re afraid that you will lose your job, or you are afraid that you will be criticized or that you will lose your popularity, or you’re afraid that somebody will stab you, or shoot at you or bomb your house; so you refuse to take the stand.

Well, you may go on and live until you are 90, but you’re just as dead at 38 as you would be at 90. And the cessation of breathing in your life is but the belated announcement of an earlier death of the spirit.” 
 
 


I AM AN AFRICAN QUEEN.

I AM BIRTHED FROM THE WATERS OF THE RIVER NILE.

I AM THE MOTHER OF THE AFRICAN ANCESTORS, WHO CREATED CHEMISTRY, MEDICINE, MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE AND THE MYSTERY SYSTEMS OF THE WORLD, JUST TO NAME A FEW OF THE MANY CONTRIBUTIONS OUR ANCESTORS HAVE BESTOWED ON THE WORLD.
I WILL NOT BE DEHUMANIZED, DISENFRANCHISED,  NOR DISRESPECTED.
I AM THE MOTHER OF WORLD AND HUMAN CIVILIZATION THAT WILL FOREVER DEMAND TO BE PLACED ON MY ROYAL AFRICAN PEDESTAL.
I AM AN AFRICAN QUEEN.


BABA RUNOKO RASHIDI'S AFRICAN RIVERS


Baba Rashidi is a Pan African Scholar, Historian, Research Specialist, Author, World Traveler, and Public Lecturer that focuses on the African presence globally and the African foundations of world civilizations.

"History is a light that illuminates the past, and a key that unlocks the door to the future."
--Runoko Rashidi

RIVER NIGER 1

RIVER NIGER 2

RIVER NIGER 3

RIVER NILE

THE LIMPOPO RIVER IN SOUTH AFRICA

ZAMBEZI RIVER IN ZIMBABWE

 ZAMBEZI RIVER IN ZIMBABWE 2

 

HOW TO BECOME A NEW AFRIKAN

Revised

1. Know your story (Maafa, Sankofa)

2. Love Afrika, we are Afrikans
 
3. Take your education serious

4. Stop calling Black folks "niggers" and stop calling Black women "bitches"

5. Promote self respect and social grace

6. Decorate your living space with Afrikan art 

7. Reflect Afrikan culture in your appearance 

8. Do not practice or support immoral sex (i.e. lesbianism, homosexuality, pedophilia) 

9. Get rid of the poverty mentality 

10. Stop using and abusing mood alternative substances (weed, alcohol, drugs) 

11. Distance yourself from negro friends and associates 

12. Support Black businesses and be a quality customer

13. Understand Caucasoids are destroyers of all animal, plant, and human life 

14. Return foreign religions to Caucasoids (Christianity, Islam, Judaism) 

15. Stop being corrupt towards Black people, we have to stop lying and stealing from one another

16. Join or work with a Black proactive non-integrationist organization 

17. Fight against racism and white supremacy/reject European images/concepts

18. Be consistent

19. Once you choose this path, stay on the path
A MOTHER AND HER CHILD




A Mother and her Child is a co-existence that no one can understand. It is a co-existence that begins at the time of conception and continues until her last breath is taken. She holds that Child in her womb, nurturing, loving, and caring for it's life until the day that life makes it's introduction into the world.
From that Earth Day forward, a Mother does her best to continue to nurture, love and care for that Child with all that she has. She prays through the trials and tribulations and awaits the milestones, cherishing all accomplishments and accolades, Giving Thanks to the Creator consistently. 
No Mother is ever prepared to have their Child transition before she does, especially the way that Trayvon Martin's has.
I ask the Creator Divine and the African Ancestors to guide, strengthen, carry, and hold close the Parents, Family, Friends, and Supporters of Trayvon, as we fight to see Justice in his tragic death. 

In the meantime, let us ALL hold our children near and dear to our hearts as we Stand Up for Trayvon Martin!

Chinue X
OATH TO OUR ANCESTORS
By Pastor Ray Hagins


O Ancestors! Blacker than a thousand midnights…
Afrikan Ancestors! It is to YOU that we, your children, give respect and honor.


O Ancestors! We call upon YOU and welcome you in this place…
Afrikan Ancestors! Let your presence fill this place.


O Ancestors! Who have been purposely excluded from the history books, so that the world would not know of your greatness…


Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave civilization to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave the arts to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave music to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave the sciences to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave mathematics to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave medicine to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave literature to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave philosophy to the world…
Our Afrikan Ancestors! Who gave God consciousness to the world…


O Ancestors! We thank you for devoting your life to make a future for us, your children, grand children, and great grandchildren.


Now, stand with us; strengthen us; guide us; teach us, and protect us from the snare of our enemies!


Rise up, O Afrikan Ancestors, and let our enemies be scattered! And give us the wisdom and the boldness to deal with our oppressors and those who would hinder the liberation and empowerment of our people.


Rise up, O Afrikan Ancestors, and live in us.


We will not fail to honor you;
We will not fail to respect you;
We will not fail to hear you;
And we will NOT betray you!


Ase’

YEMOJA


Stinson Beach, California
Taken February 6, 2011
by Chinue X

Yemoja, mother of the fishes,

Mother of the waters on the earth.

Nurture me, my mother

Protect and guide me.

Like the waves of the ocean,

wash away the trials that I bear.

Grant me children.

Grant me peace.

Let not the witches devour me.

Let not evil people destroy me.

Yemoja, mother of all,

Nurture me my mother.
This prayer to Yemoja is published in
"The Handbook of Yoruba Religious Concept,"
Authored by Bab Ifa Karade.

ON THIS DAY OF NIA (PURPOSE) - BEFORE WE CAN

BECOME ONE IN AFRICAN SOLIDARITY, WE MUST 

REMOVE THE SHACKLES THAT BIND OUR AFRICAN 

MINDS, HEARTS, AND SPIRITS!
 
"AFRICANS, FREE THYSELF IN ORDER, TO KNOW 

THYSELF, IN ORDER TO HELP THYSELF"!
                                                                     
Chinue X - 1/27/2012

AFRICAN-CENTERED BOOK LIST


AFRICAN CHILDREN READING LIST 
  • Verna Aardema, Koi & The Kola Nuts
  • Veronica Ellis, Afro-Bets First Book About Africa
  • Michael Faul, The Story of Africa and Her Flags to Color
  • Muriel Feelings, Jambo Means Hello and Moja Means One
  • Virginia Hamilton, The People Could Fly
  • Arthur Lewin, Africa is Not a Country, It's a Continent
  • Sundaria Morninghouse, Harbari Gani? What's the News?
  • Sherley Anne Williams, Working Cotton
  • Jane Yolen, Encounter
 
AFRICAN YOUTH READING LIST
  • Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart
  • S.E.Anderson, The Black Holocaust for Beginners
  • Na'im Akbar, Chains and Images of Psychological Slavery and [color=red]VISIONS[/red] for BLACK MEN
  • Akil, From Niggas to Gods, Part One
  • Chike Akua, A Treasure Within
  • Molefi Kete Asante, Classical Africa
  • Ayi Kwei Armah, Two Thousand Seasons
  • Mwalimu Baruti, The Sex Imperative
  • Anthony Browder, From the Browder Files
  • Octavia Butler, Parable of the Sower
  • James Cameron, A Time of Terror
  • John Henrik Clarke, Africans at the Crossroads
  • Gaidi Faraj, Ourstory: Afrikans from Antiquity to the 21st Century
  • Sam Greenlee,The Spook Who Sat by the Door
  • Asa G. Hilliard, Larry Williams and Nia Damali (eds), The Teachings of Ptahhote
  • Jacqueline Johnson, Stokely Carmichael
  • Indus Khamit-Kush, What They Never Told You in History Class
  • Zak A. Kondo, The Black Student's Guide to Positive Education and His-storical Lies and Myths that Miseducate Black People
  • Joseph Marshall, Street Soldier
  • Patricia & Frederick McKissach, Rebels Against Slavery
  • Erriel D. Roberson, The Maafa & Beyond
  • J.A.Rogers, Great Men of Color, Vols. I & II
  • Sister Souljah, The Coldest Winter Ever
  • Carter G. Woodson, The Miseducation of the Negro
  • Amos N. Wilson, The Falsification of Afrikan Consciousness
  • Bobby E. Wright, The Psychopathic Racial Personality
  • Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X

Today, January 1, is a Day of Self Reflection According to Kawaida Theory

Kwanzaa is based upon the premise of KAWAIDA:


"that social revolutionary change for Black America can be achieved by the act of revealing and disclosing individuals to their cultural African heritage." Karenga


Each year, on January 1st, Dr. Karenga suggests that we ask ourselves the three (3) Kawaida questions, originally posed by Frantz Fanon, author of "Wretched of the Earth."




KAWAIDA QUESTIONS:


1. WHO AM I?
"To answer the question of "Who am I?" correctly, then, is to know and live one's history and to practice one's culture."


2. AM I REALLY ALL I SAY I AM?
"To answer the question of "Am I really all I say I am?" is to have and employ a cultural criteria of authenticity, i.e., criteria of what is real and unreal, what is appearance and essence, what is culturally-rooted and foreign."


3. AM I ALL I OUGHT TO BE?
"And to answer the question of "Am I all I ought to be?" is to self-consciously possess and use ethical and cultural standards which measure men, women and children in terms of the quality of their thought and practice in the context of who they are and must become - in both an African and human sense."


http://www.endarkenment.com/kwanzaa/nguzosaba/sikuyataamuli.htm