THE MEANING OF KWANZAA


KWANZAA YENU IWE NA HERI!
 http://afgen.com/kwanzaa2.html


Kwanzaa is a spiritual, festive and joyous celebration of the oneness and goodness of life, which claims no ties with any religion. It has definite principles, practices and symbols which are geared to the social and spiritual needs of African-Americans. The reinforcing gestures are designed to strengthen our collective self-concept as a people, honor our past, critically evaluate our present and commit ourselves to a fuller, more productive future.


Kwanzaa, which means "first fruits of the harvest" in the African language Kiswahili, has gained tremendous acceptance. Since its founding in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga, Kwanzaa has come to be observed by more than 28 million people worldwide. Celebrated from December 26th to January 1st, it is based on Nguzo Saba (seven guiding principles), one for each day of the observance: 


Ritual Objects & Symbols
Mkeka -- straw table mat, on which all other objects are placed
Mazao -- crops, symbols of the fruits of collective labor
Muhindi -- one ear of corn for each child, symbolizing fertility
Kikombe cha umoja -- the unity cup, used to perform the libation ritual
Zawadi -- gifts, traditional items that encourage success
Kinara -- candleholder, a symbol of ancestry
Mishumaa saba -- seven candles, one for each of the seven Kwanzaa principles.



Each night, the family gathers to light the candles of the kinara, adding one candle for each day of the holiday. A traditional feast is held on the night of December 31.  Gifts are usually opened on the last day of Kwanzaa, January 1.  Gifts are considered part of the "kuumba," or creativity, principle and are encouraged. Traditional presents are books and heritage symbols. The Traditional Greeting is "Habari gani?", to which one replies with the Kwanzaa principle of the day.


DAY #1: MONDAY, 12/26
HABARI GANI? UMOJA 
(OO-MO-JAH) UNITY 
Stresses the importance of togetherness for the family and the community, which is reflected in the African saying, "I am We," or "I am because We are.

DAY #2: TUESDAY 12/27
HABARI GANI? KUJICHAGULIA 
(KOO-GEE-CHA-GOO-LEE-YAH) SELF-DETERMINATION 
Requires that we define our common interests and make decisions that are in the best interest of our family and community.  


DAY #3: WEDNESDAY, 12/28
HABARI GANI? UJIMA 
(OO-GEE-MAH) COLLECTIVE WORK AND RESPONSIBILITY 
Reminds us of our obligation to the past, present and future, and that we have a role to play in the community, society, and world. 


DAY #4: THURSDAY, 12/29
HABARI GANI? UJAMAA 
(OO-JAH-MAH) COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS 
Emphasizes our collective economic strength and encourages us to meet common needs through mutual support.


DAY #5: FRIDAY, 12/30/2011
HABARI GANI? NIA 
(NEE-YAH) PURPOSE 
Encourages us to look within ourselves and to set personal goals that are beneficial to the community. 


DAY #6: SATURDAY, 12/31
HABARI GANI? KUUMBA 
(KOO-OOM-BAH) CREATVITY  
Makes use of our creative energies to build and maintain a strong and vibrant community. 


DAY #7: SUNDAY, 01/01
HABARI GANI? IMANI 
(EE-MAH-NEE) FAITH
Focuses on honoring the best of our traditions, draws upon the best in ourselves, and helps us strive for a higher level of life for humankind, by affirming our self-worth and confidence in our ability to succeed and triumph in righteous struggle.


HARAMBEE! HARAMBEE! HARAMBEE! HARAMBEE! HARAMBEE! HARAMBEE! HARAMBEE!
"WHAT'S THE NEWS?"
KWANZAA EVENTS IN THE DC, MD, & VA AREAS

DECEMBER 27th,

 


                                                                                                                                   
It's Kwanzaa Time!!! - 2011

A lot of you were invited to different Kwanzaa Events but responded with I wish I could have been there, or I wish they had something like that where I am...
Well that is possible!
The Harambee Connection and friends once again invite you to join an Online Kwanzaa Gathering where you can attend at the comfort of your home, work, or wherever you are...
Connect with us at Tuesday, December 27th 7-10pm eastern time:
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/harambeeconnection/2011/12/28/the-hc-live-direct

or call in to (626) 696-8517 for your live participation.

This Online Global Kwanzaa Gathering is where you and other celebrants of Kwanzaa are coming together from near and far, representing a portion of the Africans in the diaspora that have this unique time to come together at the same relative time. Showing our Umoja, expressing our Kujichagulia and sharing in Libations, Spoken Word, Music and more....

Tell your friends and family, and join the gathering. We look forward to your presence and participation.

Kujichagulia Night 2011. A Self-Determination Celebration
The Government of the UNIA-ACL Legal Defense Committee and the King Baba Kamau - Queen Mother James UNIA-ACL Divisioin 332 presents:
Keynote Speaker: Mama Tendai Paula Johnson of the African Diaspora Ancestral Commemoration Institute - ADACI

UNIA-ACL Citizenship Induction Program

President General: Senghor Baye
Counsel General: I-Nia Reginia Rogers
Inner-Attainment by KaBa
Candle Lighting Ceremony
Dinner Sales - African Market Place
2315 18th Pl. N.E., Washington, DC 20018
Free Admission
For Further Information Call: 202-636-1116


DECEMBER 28TH






THE DANCE INSTITUTE OF WASHINGTON
Fabian Barnes, Founder and Artistic Director

PRESENTS
DIW's Annual Spirit of Kwanzaa Celebration Concerts

Columbia Heights Education Campus Auditorium
3101 16th Street, NW
Washington, DC  20010

Wednesday, December 28th:
* Opening Night Performance, 7pm start; doors 6:30pm
 
 



AND

DECEMBER 29TH
Thursday, December 29th:
* Evening Performance 7pm start; doors 6:30pm





DECEMBER 30TH
NIA KWANZAA CELEBRATION - Hosted by Dr. Yew
Friday, December 30th (7pm - 10pm)
Everlasting Life
9185 Central Ave.
Capitol Heights, MD!
Cost - Donation of your choice
Vendors Needed!- Reasonable Pricing
Contact (202) 413-4581 for more info.


 

 

December 31st Capital City Kwanzaa Festival

1:00p to 9:00p

at Showplace Exhibition Center, Richmond, VA

Price: $6-7

Phone: (804) 644-3900

Age Suitability: All Ages

Elegba Folklore Society, Richmond’s Cultural Ambassador, presents the 2011 Capital City Kwanzaa Festival on Saturday, December 31, 1:00 p.m. – 9:00pm at The Showplace Exhibition Center, 3000 Mechanicsville Turnpike, Richmond, Virginia.
The 2011 Capital City Kwanzaa Festival presents a carefully planned series of events that please the palette of attendees and capture the spirit and the significance of the Kwanzaa holiday.


RESOURCES
http://toronto.mediacoop.ca/blog/ajamu-nangwaya/9463

I AM AN AFRICAN IN AMERICA!

I AM CHINUE X!


I AM CREATED AND MOLDED FROM THE DIVINE CREATOR'S AND THE AFRICAN ANCESTORS’ OWN BLESSINGS!


I AM A DAUGHTER, SISTER, MOTHER, LOVER,
FRIEND BUT FIRST AND FIRST MOST, I AM AN AFRICAN QUEEN!

I HAVE INHERITED GREATNESS AND ROYALTY
FROM THE SOIL OF ALKEBULAN, KMT, AND THE RIVER NILE!


I POSSESS ANCESTRAL WARRIOR SPIRITS OF AFRICAN LINEAGE THAT DEMANDS, DEFENDS AND FIGHTS FOR EQUALITY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE FOR ALL AFRICAN PEOPLE!

IN HONOR OF ALL AFRICAN KINGS AND QUEENS, I WILL NOT BE INTIMIDATED,
DEGRADATED OR DEHUMANIZED!

I AM AFRICAN IN AMERICA!


Chinue X, November 30, 2011

TEACH FREEDOM




The self-conscious use of education as an instrument of liberation among Africans and Africans in American as old as education among African Americans. This dynamic anthology is about those forms of education intended to help people think more critically about the social forces shaping their lives and think more confidently about their ability to react against those forces. Featuring articles by educator-activists Fannie Theresa Rushing,Charles M.Payne, Susan Wilcox, Charles E. Cobb Jr, and others, this collection explores the largely forgotten history of attempts by African Americans such as Septima Clark, Ella Baker and Mary McLeod-Bethune to use education as a tool of collective liberation. Together these articles explore the variety of forms those attempts have taken, from the shadow of slavery to the contradictions of hip-hop. Contributors address Lessons from the Past and discuss Citizenship Schools in the south, Ella Baker and the Harlem Y, Mississippi Freedom Schools, and Black Panther Liberation Schools. Contemporary models are covered as well, demonstrating the depth and tenacity of the tradition in such efforts as the Freedom Schools established by the Childrens Defense Fund.

WHY CULTURAL REVOLUTION?

“In this Cultural Revolution, As Afrkns we MUST Deconstruct Eurocentric behaviors and ideologies of Individualism, in order to Reconstruct our Afrkn Self in Communal Collectivism. To be a True Pan Afrkn is to be CENTERED in Afrkn Tradition, Heritage and Culture – Grounded in the knowing of True Ancient Kmt Civilization and Afrkn Antiquity and our True Contributions to World Civilization and the building of the Americas. To be a True Pan Afrkn is to not view Yourself as an Afrkn American, but to see Your Self as an Afrkn. To "Know Thyself" as a True Pan Afrkn is to hold, as a Life Priority, the Best Interest of ALL Afrkn People.”


The Chinue X Project, Inc. September 2011

Chinue X's Book List #2

"A sterling effort to bring together ideas and research...in order to begin to build a foundation for an alternative education process for black children" Essie Manuel Rutledge, Contemporary Sociology


"Hale provides parents, teachers and school adminstrators with a model for a "culturally appropriate pedagogy" to insure more-positve educational outcomes for African American Children." from the Foreword by V.P. Franklin


"The seeds for the problem of the 13-21 age group were planted, watered, and cultivated long before, and bear the distinctive bitter fruits of motivation. We as a society continue to reap a weak, bitter harvest because we sow such weak, bitter seeds." Sanyika Anwisye, Co-Director, Frederick Douglas Institure, St. Louis

"Whatever individual or institution controls test construction, test production, test promotion and testmous power over the lives and fortunes of students,teachers, counselors, administrators, and American communites." The Late Norman R. Dixon dissemination exercises enor

Chinue X's Book List #1

 
Akbar, Na'im.  2003. Akbar Papers In African Psycholology.
Mind Productions & Associates, Inc. Tallahassee, Fl.

Asante, Molefi K. 1990. Kemet, Afrocentricity and Knowledge Africa World Press, Inc. Trenton, NJ.


African-Centered Education

        In 1994, Haki Madhubuti and Dr. Safisha Mahbubuti, published a small book via Third World Press. It is a 24-page boook that is dynamic in it's subject matter, African -Centered Education, It's Value, Importance, and Necessity in the Development of Black Children. The first paragraph reads:

     "In America, people of African descent are caught between a hurricane and a volcano when it comes to the acquisition of life-giving and life-sustaining knowledge. Too many of our children are trapped in urban schools systems that have been "programmed" for failure. All to often the answer to what must be done to correct this injustice is left in the hands of those most responsible for creating the problem. If your child is sleeping and a rat starts to bite at his/her head you don't ask the rat to please stop biting at your child's brain. If you are a sane, normal, and loving parent, you go on the attack and try your damnedest to kill the rat."

The Madhubutis has stated what has been happening with our children and youth in the educational systems around the world for hundreds of years. Historically, Afrikan and Afrikan Amerikan children and youth have received eurocentric worldview education that has left them mis-guided, mis-informed, and mis-educated.

They discuss in length the Independent Black School Movement, which grew out of the 60s Black empowerment struggles and initiatives. From this movement came the Council of Independent Black Institues (CIBI). They present an African Centered Pedagogy  which produces an education that contributes to achieving pride, equity, power, wealth and culture continuity for Diasporan and Continental Afrikans. The following are goals that are specific to an effective African-Centered Education.
  1. Legitimizes african stores of knowledge.
  2. Positively exploits and scaffolds productive community and cultural practices.
  3. Extends and builds upon the indigenous language.
  4. Reinforces community ties and idealizes services to one's family, community, nation, race, and world.
  5. Promotes positive social relationships,
  6. Imparts a worldview that idealizes a positive, sufficient future for one's people without denying the self-worth and right to self-determination of others.
  7. Supports cultural continuity while promoting crtitical consciousness.

Out of honor and respect for our ancestors, we need to began to protest and construct an alternative to the existing education Afrikan children and youth receive. We need to demand an education that speaks to their heritage and history. The alternatives need to be culturally sensitive to ALL children and youth.

To purchase this book and many more contact Third World Press, Chicago Il. http://www.twpbooks.com/catalog/

Afrocentrism in Children and Youth

Greetings to All!

My name is Chinue X (pronounced cheen-way) which means 'God's own Blessing in Igbo Nigeria. My objective in creating this blog is to dialogue on the value and importance of Afrocentrism in Children and Youth.

For too long, Afrikans, both diasporan and continental, have been mis-educated by an euroocentric worldview that has intentionally omitted, distorted and mirepresented the Afrikan contributions to world civilization and the building of the Americas.

No longer do we as Afrikans have to sit in the back of the bus and allow the educational system to de-value, denigrate, distort, and divide our race. No longer do we have to read textbooks that negate and omit our existence, or perpetuate a  supremacist worldview. Thanks to the world wide web, we can access "TRUTH" that is credible and valid on our existence.

My goals are to disseminate true facts on the Afrikan's role as the number one contributor of all cultural aspects of civilization and being and to share resources that will uplift the Afrikan race.

Asante